Coffee India

Coffee production in India is dominated in the hill tracts of South Indian States, with the state of Karnataka accounting 53% followed by Kerala 28% and Tamil Nadu 11% of production of 8,200 tonnes. Indian coffee is said to be the finest coffee grown in the shade rather than direct sunlight anywhere in the world. There are approximately 250,000 coffee growers in India; 98% of them are small growers. As of 2009, the production of coffee in India was only 4.5% of the total production in the world. Almost 80% of the country’s coffee production is exported.
Coffee is grown in three regions of India with Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu forming the traditional coffee growing region of South India, followed by the new areas developed in the non-traditional areas of Andhra Pradesh and Orissa in the eastern coast of the country and with a third region comprising the states of Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Tripura, Nagaland and Arunachal Pradesh of Northeastern India, popularly known as “Seven Sister States of India”.

coffees-of-india
Indian coffee, grown mostly in southern India under monsoon rainfall conditions, is also termed as “Indian monsooned coffee”. The two well -known varieties of coffee grown are the Arabica and Robusta. The first variety that was introduced in the Baba Budan Giri hill ranges of Karnataka in the 17th century was marketed over the years under the brand names of Kent and S.795.
The Indian context started with an Indian Muslim saint, Baba Budan, while returning from pilgrimage to Mecca, brought seven coffee beans (by tying it around his waist) from Yemen to Mysore in India and planted them on the Chandragiri Hills, now named after the saint as Baba Budan Giri (‘means “hill”) in Chikkamagaluru district. This was the beginning of coffee industry in India, and in particular, in the then state of Mysore, now part of the Karnataka State.
Systematic cultivation soon followed Baba Budan’s first planting of the seeds, in 1670, mostly by private owners and the first plantation was established in 1840 around Baba Budan Giri and its surrounding hills in Karnataka. It spread to other areas of Wynad (now part of Kerala), the Shevaroys and Nilgiris in Tamil Nadu. With British colonial presence taking strong roots in India in the mid-19th century, coffee plantations flourished for export. The culture of coffee thus spread to South India rapidly.

India Coffee Board

Map of Cameroon1

As it is common knowledge, decaf coffee has caffeine maybe not as much as regular coffee, but it does have caffeine. A lot of people who are sensitive to caffeine continue searching for alternatives to coffee without caffeine. There are substitutes like roasted chicory root which is naturally caffeine free that some people use that as a substitute to coffee. The good news is that a newly discovered solution has presented itself in the form of a naturally caffeine free coffee!
It’s often said that, like tea and chocolate, coffee naturally contains caffeine. But there’s much more to it than that. It turns out that different coffee varieties have naturally differing amounts of caffeine. For example, Arabica coffee has about 2/3 the amount of caffeine that Robusta coffee has. But there’s one coffee plant that’s especially unique in this regard, because it has NO CAFFEINE.

Flag of Cameroon
It’s called Coffea charrieriana, or Charrier coffee, and it’s a naturally caffeine-free coffee. Coffea charrieriana is a species of flowering plant in the Rubiaceae family. It is a coffee plant from Cameroon that is newly discovered. Unlike the many popular types of Arabica and Robusta beans we find in commercially produced coffee, Charrier coffee is from a different variety of the coffee plant which is not yet commercially produced. It was only discovered in the year 2008 by Professor André Charrier, whose focus for 30 years was gathering and researching different varieties of coffee at the French research institute ‘Institut de Recherche pour le Développement’ and it is accordingly named after him. At present, Charrier coffee is the only known caffeine-free coffee plant from Central Africa.
We gather that development on growing this plant for commercial purpose is in progress and we can only hope to see this ‘caffeine’ free coffee available to us in the next few years! After all, ‘TIS’ (This is Africa)!

Cafe de CamerounCafe Stamp Cameroun

Ethiopian Coffee1 Ethiopia has all the important elements for growing coffee: the right altitudes, ample rainfall, suitable temperature and very fertile soil. These conditions allow the growing of coffee across the board. Limu coffee from South Western Ethiopia is a premium gourmet coffee and grows at an altitude of 3600-6200 feet. ‘Limu’ is a general term used to indicate coffee that is fully washed processed.

LimuArabica Coffee is planted on about 40,000 hectares of land located in the East, West and South of Addis Ababa the capital of Ethiopia. Eighty percent of Ethiopian exported coffee consists of Arabica Coffee that is naturally sun dried. The remainder is washed as is the Limu. The coffee names are given after the geographical location where they grow, Limu being one as is Harar, Yirgacheffe, Sidamo etc.
Washed Limu coffee is a premium gourmet coffee that is sought after by roasters for producing ‘single origin’ as well as creating unique blends of their own. This is tLimu3he crème de la crème of Ethiopian washed coffees. The Ethiopian Limu that we have just received in our stock cups as a wonderfully layered and complex bouquet of tastes. It has a floral aroma with a burst of citrus and sweet spice, and a balanced body and leaves you with a chocolate aftertaste. The bean is medium in size and has a distinctive rounded shape and greenish colour. The coffee has the feeling of spring and summer in a cup and this is the right time to stock up!

We have a limited supply of this supreme coffee so call or write to us for pricing and shipping.Ethiopia

This is a process sometimes referred to as the ‘third way’. For people familiar with the two key coffee processing methods will recognize this as a kind of a concession between the two key processing methods: the natural or dry method where beans are dried while entirely encased inside the cherry and the washed or wet method where all the cherry encasing is removed and the beans are completely washed away with water before drying.

Semi Washed Coffee

Semi Washed Coffee also termed as ‘honey’ is coffee that is dried with all or some of the sticky fruit pulp or called ‘honey’ still sticking to the bean. The outer skin gets removed in a fashion similar to the wet process while the pulpy mucilage is left to dry on the bean. When processed properly, semi washed coffees have an intense sweetness with rounded acidity and a strong and heavy body.

We get shipments of this interesting semi washed coffees from time to time. Please check our offerings page to see what is available.

Welcome to Kencaf.com!

Bringing you the best green coffee beans the world has to offer and the knowledge, quality and service that comes with over forty years of experience.  We stock green coffee from over fifty countries around the world.  The variety we offer and the quick delivery times make us ideal suppliers to roasters throughout the U.S. and Canada.


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      As it is common knowledge, decaf coffee has caffeine maybe not as much as regular coffee, but it does have caffeine. A lot of people who are sensitive to caffeine continue searching for alternatives to coffee without caffeine. There are

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