Vietnam FlagCoffee has been cultivated for generations in origin countries around the world. Not so in Vietnam, where coffee accounted for just 1 percent of world trade in 1990. Remarkably, by the year 2000, the country had eclipsed Colombia to become the world’s second-largest coffee producer after Brazil. How did the country manage to escalate its coffee production so quickly?
For decades, the Vietnamese government controlled the country’s agricultural land. But the country was isolated politically, and the government agreed to make policy changes to spur the country’s economy and help Vietnam forge ties with other nations.
When Vietnam’s Congress relinquished government ownership of farmland in 1986, citizens gained the right to farm their own land and sell their crops on the open market. Just three years later, the International Coffee Agreement (ICA) suspended its quota requirement. Designed to help stabilize world coffee prices, the ICA treaty established flexible quotas and price guidelines for coffee export. Vietnam was not a member of the ICA and did not have market incentives to increase its coffee production under the agreement. Now, with land at their disposal and a liberalized market for their crops, Vietnamese farmers decided to grow coffee. And grow it they did.
During the 1990s when there was the coffee boom in Vietnam, it was very lucrative. So a lot of people jumped into the industry. But the good times did not last; in 2001, with a glut of coffee on the market, world coffee prices collapsed to their lowest level in more than 30 years. According to International Coffee Organization data, robusta traded at 80 U.S. cents per pound in 1998, but had fallen to less than 25 cents per pound in 2001. At the same time, arabica prices also dropped, in part because multinational companies were able to blend less expensive robusta with arabica for a higher profit margin, and farmers didn’t see the financial reward for maintaining high quality. As a result, coffee producers around the world faced earnings lower than production costs. Vietnam, with its vigorous supply of robusta, shouldered much of the blame for the falling prices. The country began to stockpile coffee reserves in an effort to boost prices.
Today, Vietnam remains the world’s top producer of robusta, which is most often used in blends and as instant coffee. Ninety-five percent of the coffee grown in Vietnam is robusta. Coffee organizations are offering farmer training and subsidies on planting material. And certification agencies, including the 4C Association, Rainforest Alliance and UTZ Certified, are also teaching farmer groups about agricultural best practices from other origins. Compared with other origins around the world, Vietnam is still in its infancy as a coffee producer. Now that the country’s farmers have shown their aptitude for growing robusta, all eyes will be on the country as it considers its future.

While many products commonly found in the grocery aisles are just now receiving the environmentally friendly treatment, some are old-timers in the field. Consider the case of coffee.
Specialty coffee now comes with an ever-increasing variety of certifications and labels confirming their supposed benefits for consumers and the environment, but despite these surface changes, has the product on shelves actually become more sustainable?
Read more: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-green-is-your-coffee/?

For about as long as we’ve had presidents, we’ve had coffee in the White House. From John Adams drinking coffee to be more patriotic (with that Boston Tea Party and all) to Dwight Eisenhower spending D-Day “drinking endless cups of coffee” to John F. Kennedy’s using “Coffee with the Kennedys” to help win his US Senate seat in Massachusetts, the brew has been an important part of politics. Here’s a look at some notable presidents over the years, and their different coffee-drinking habits.
Read more: http://www.bostonglobe.com/

september_coffee_marketCrop year 2013/14 is now finished in all exporting countries, and despite a year’s worth of speculation and persistent price volatility, total global production is nearly unchanged from last year at 145.2 million bags, according to the latest estimates from the International Coffee Organization.
Read more: http://dailycoffeenews.com/2014/10/22

Welcome to Kencaf.com!

Bringing you the best green coffee beans the world has to offer and the knowledge, quality and service that comes with over forty years of experience.  We stock green coffee from over fifty countries around the world.  The variety we offer and the quick delivery times make us ideal suppliers to roasters throughout the U.S. and Canada.


  • Who we are

    Founded in June of 1992, we are a corporation that focuses on sourcing out quality green coffee from around the world and bringing it to our customers in North America.


    Learn more about who we are!

  • Current offering

    We have variety of coffee from all over the world. Click the button below to see our current offerings.

    View current offerings

  • Did you know?

    Coffee trees produce highly aromatic, short-lived flowers producing a scent between jasmine and orange. These blossoms produce cranberry-sized coffee cherries. It takes four to five years to yield a commercial harvest.

  • Stay up to date

    Subscribe to our newsletter to stay up to date with the latest from Kencaf and more!
    Sign up now!
    For Email Marketing you can trust

Supplying all your green coffee needs since 1973!


  • Latest from Kencaf.com

    • VIETNAM

      Coffee has been cultivated for generations in origin countries around the world. Not so in Vietnam, where coffee accounted for just 1 percent of world trade in 1990. Remarkably, by the year 2000, the country had eclipsed Colombia to become

    • How Green Is Your Coffee?

      While many products commonly found in the grocery aisles are just now receiving the environmentally friendly treatment, some are old-timers in the field. Consider the case of coffee.
      Specialty coffee now comes with an ever-increasing variety of certifications and labels

  • Recent video

    What is Rainforest Alliance?